“We had to burn the awards in order to save them”

August 23rd, 2015

So, the 2015 Hugos have been awarded, and it’s now obvious that the in-group that has controlled the awards for a number of years felt that it was better not to make awards than to let the wrong people (or those supported by the wrong people) win.

I didn’t vote in every category – I won’t vote if I’m not conversant with the nominees. I feel that it’s a matter of integrity not to vote for or against things I haven’t read or watched. Given that half or more of the votes in categories dominated by Puppy nominees were for “no award” and a number of people stated that they were going to vote that way without reading any of the nominated works, it’s obvious that many people don’t believe the same way. I’d be very interested in seeing how many of the “no award” votes had only no award votes, and how many of them cast votes ranking nominees in one or more categories.

I watched the first two hours of the livestream, although I missed the opening skit. I must say, I was disappointed but not surprised by the sniggering about the asterisk being the official emblem of this year’s Hugo awards, David Gerrold’s little “happy dance” when the audience cheered that “no award” won in the Best Related Work category, and winner speeches that included statements that “Black lives matter” and “I’d like to thank The Patriarchy.” I went to bed around that time, but Mr. Gerrold apparently said at some later time in the ceremony that while cheering “no award” was acceptable, booing it was not.

As I said, I was disappointed but not surprised – this is the sort of thing I’ve come to expect from organized fandom. It’s a major reason why I’ve not been active in local fandom for a number of years, although whether I gafiated or fafiated depends on your point of view. I’ve talked about this before, but apparently only in comments on other websites. There is a widespread presumption in fandom that everyone in fandom is at least liberal, if not further to the left, and the people who aren’t are stupid, evil, or worse, and are certainly not due any consideration or politeness.

It leads to an environment in which people feel comfortable making statements denigrating conservatives, conservative ideas, and Republicans. The “logic” seems to be, “These are my views, and I’m smart, therefore I’m right, and anyone who disagrees is both stupid and incorrect, but there’s nobody here like that, right?” I don’t like arguing, so I prefer not to go places where I get stressed, but it’s been pointed out that abdicating the field in that way is the sort of thing that helped allow the SJW takeover of the field.

Getting back to the Hugos, it also leads to the way the Puppy nominees and backers have been characterized by the gatekeepers. I’ve never met Larry Correia and Vox Day, but I have met Sarah Hoyt, and the widespread characterization of them and the Puppy nominees as being “straight white males writing about straight white males” can only be considered accurate if you say that the anti-Puppy forces are allowed to assign sex and ethnicity regardless of biology or consistency.

I’ll admit that, while I really liked and was impressed by many of the Puppy nominees, I don’t consider all of them to have been Hugo-worthy. However, even the worst of them was better than some of last year’s highly-touted nominees (“If You Were Attacked by Cardboard Stereotypes, My Love,” for example).

I’ve looked at a few of the Hugo roundup and response posts, and over at Vox Day’s site, some commenters are blaming the Puppy voters for voting “no award,” which is ridiculous to those who’ve been following what he and others have said. Basically, this year they played it straight; next year they’ll vote to burn down the awards, since the people afraid of the awards going to the wrong people have led the way. As Vox Day pointed out, the official announcement didn’t even mention the categories in which no award was made.

There were five categories in which no award was made this year. That matches the number of “no awards” in all of the prior history of the Hugos. Personally, I don’t believe that the nominees this year were that incredibly and historically bad. The gatekeepers have shown the extent to which they’re willing to go to keep control of the awards. It will be interesting, and likely disheartening, to see what happens next.

Reminds me of the stupid things I did

August 10th, 2015

Here we have an individual throwing (and batting around) gasoline-soaked flaming tennis balls.

When I was younger, back in the days when beer and soft drink cans were still made of steel, rather than aluminum, it was possible to cut the tops and bottoms from two or three cans, tape them together to make a tube, and add one more can with several holes in one end and a single hole in the other to act as a combustion chamber. This was known as a “coke can cannon.” Squirt a little lighter fluid into the combustion chamber, shake it around to increase the amount of vapor, drop a tennis ball in the other end, and launch it by holding a match to the hole in the bottom of the combustion chamber.

If you “wet down” the tennis ball with lighter fluid before putting it into the tube, it would come out flaming, which looked cool if done at night.

Of course, you did have to worry about the combustion chamber exploding. I never had that happen, luckily, but I did once put a significant dent in the garage door when recoil caused the cannon to jump from my hand.

As I said, one of the stupid things I did when I was younger.

It’s all rather amusing, really

August 1st, 2015

I’m watching a documentary I recorded on Turner Classic Movies, titled God Respects Us When We Work, But Loves Us When We Dance.

It’s a short documentary of the first Los Angeles love-in, which took place on Easter Sunday, 1967. No narration or dialogue, just film footage with a musical track. Lots of people with flowers, although overall the crowd was smaller than I would have anticipated. Given that it was only two years after the Watts riots, it’s interesting that there’s no apparent racial tension.

What struck me most, though, was how people were dressed. I wasn’t surprised by the men in casual clothes, tunics, and even loincloths, the women in everything from strategically-tied scarves and diaphanous nothings to maxi-skirts and minidresses, and children in what looked like serapes made from throw rugs. What I didn’t expect were the men wearing ties – I’d forgotten that there was still a fair amount of formality in dress back then, even in the counterculture. I kind of miss that look.

Something I didn’t see in the film were people who were fat. Overall, people didn’t weigh as much back then, and it shows when you see something like this.

It also shows when I look the mirror, but that’s another story.

I Voted!

July 31st, 2015

The exclamation point is a little much, I’ll admit, but I submitted my ballot for this year’s Hugo awards tonight. I didn’t vote in all categories, because I wasn’t familiar with all of the nominees. As an example, the only nominee in the category “Long Form Dramatic Presentation” that I saw was Guardians of the Galaxy. Then again, that’s not unusual for me.

I won’t vote in a category where I haven’t seen/read all the nominees. As a result, I voted in eight categories, and didn’t vote in ten. I’ll be interested in learning the results when they’re announced next month.

SCIENCE!

July 28th, 2015

Got a few interesting science-related links.

A new study has determined that about 60% of differences in academic performance are due to genetics.

It’s been known for some time that there’s a positive correlation between intelligence and lifespan. Now, they’ve determined that link is also genetic.

I’d like to have seen links to the original data sources documenting this climate change fraud, but I’ve been reading this website off-and-on for a few years, and it seems pretty reliable. There is a link in the comments to this graph at NOAA.

The EM Drive has now been independently verified to produce thrust, although nobody can explain how yet. If this is real, this is big – I’ve seen claims of 4 hours to the moon, 70 days to Mars, and a year-and-a-half to Pluto.

Happy 75th, Bugs!

July 27th, 2015

Bugs Bunny first uttered his famous, “What’s up, doc?” on July 27th, 1940.

Running late

July 6th, 2015

Last Tuesday, as a late Father’s Day/early birthday present, my daughter took me to a class in making and cooking with bacon. We had a lovely meal, which we had helped prepare, I learned a few new things about cooking (especially with respect to running dough through a pasta machine), and we each took home some raw pork belly that was marinating.

Mine is still marinating in the fridge. Technically, I should have roasted it for pork belly or smoked it for bacon on Friday or Saturday, but I haven’t gotten around to it yet – I was under the weather over the weekend. Oh, well. I’ll get to it tomorrow or the next day. I just have to decide how I’m going to prepare it, and what I’m going to pair it with.

War is Peace. Ignorance is Strength. Shit is Shinola.

June 25th, 2015

And words no longer have meaning. Pardon the strong language, but, as we no longer live in a country under the rule of law, I feel like expressing myself strongly.

I expected King v. Burwell to go the other way, because the evidence was so strong. I felt that way about Eldred and Kelo, too, so I should have expected this.

Boycott in progress

June 20th, 2015

In relation to Sad Puppies, a boycott of Tor Books has been called for, due to the statements and actions of various people in charge at Tor.

I am not a sad puppy, but I am in sympathy with their position and their aims. I don’t buy as many books as I used to, but I have accumulated quite a library over the years, and Tor books make up a non-negligible portion of my library. One action that has been requested is for everyone who plans to participate in the boycott to submit a photograph of their Tor books. Mine is below. It only shows the books that were on the bookshelves in the house, however. I have more books than I can keep handy, so about half of my library is in boxes in the garage. There are about 85 Tor books shown stacked on the floor, and my books database tells me that I have about 50 more in the garage. Several years ago, I gave my daughter a few hundred books, and I’ve no idea how many Tor books may have been among them.

I also have two dozen or so Tor ebooks.

I won’t be acquiring any more, though. Tor gives every impression of having a corporate culture that despises anyone who isn’t wholly on board with the left-wing causes of the day, and is more than willing to demonize them. As that applies to me, since they despise me, I’ll not force them to associate with me any longer.

Some of the books published by Tor in my collection.

Some of the books published by Tor in my collection.

Going to the Faire

June 11th, 2015

I’ve been kind of neglecting posting for a while. Nothing much to say, and not a lot going on. Also, busy at work.

That’s changed a bit – this weekend, I’ll be manning a booth for my company at the Denver Mini Maker Faire at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. I’ve been working on software for an application to demonstrate our new Mercury boards. Our booth will be right next to the Denver Hackerspace booth. We’ll definitely be talking with them to find out how they’re using the supplies and equipment we donated when we moved from our old office to our current location.

I’ll have to find the booths for the Denver Mad Scientists and Epilog Laser, since I have friends that should be at both.

The show runs 9 am-5 pm on Saturday and Sunday. We’ll be setting up our booth tomorrow. Should be fun. Please show up if you’re in the area.